Friday, May 24, 2024

Sudanese Dinar (SDD)

The Sudanese Dinar (SDD) was the official currency of the northeast African country of Sudan from 1992 to 2007.

The Central Bank of Sudan administers the Sudanese Dinar and is responsible for issuing and managing the country’s currency supply.

The currency code of

Sudanese Dinar is SDD, and the commonly used symbol is “LSd“.

History of Sudanese Dinar

The Sudanese dinar replaced the Sudanese pound (SDP) in 1992 at an exchange rate of 1 dinar to 10 British pounds.

The currency was used until 2007, when Sudan decided to reintroduce the Sudanese Pound (SDG) due to the provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that ended the civil war in the north and south regions of Sudan.

The new Sudanese pound replaces the Sudanese dinar at an exchange rate of 1 British pound to 100 dinars.

Denominations and Breakdowns

The Sudanese dinar is divided into 100 smaller units called piastres or qirsh.

Coins are available in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 piastres and 1 dinar.

Banknotes are available in denominations of 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 dinars.

The designs on Sudanese dinar coins and banknotes often depict the country’s cultural symbols, historical figures and landmarks, reflecting the country’s rich heritage and history.

Exchange rate and economy

When the Sudanese Dinar is in circulation, the exchange rate may fluctuate due to various factors such as national economic performance, inflation, currency supply and demand in the international market, etc.

The exchange rate for the Dinar no longer applies as the Dinar has been replaced by the Sudanese Pound (SDG).

Sudan’s economy relies heavily on agriculture and oil production. However, it has been negatively affected by conflict, political instability and international sanctions, which have hampered its growth and development.

Summary

The Sudanese Dinar was the official currency of Sudan from 1992 to 2007 and is administered by the Central Bank of Sudan.

replaced the Sudanese pound in 1992 and was subsequently replaced again by the Sudanese pound in 2007.

The currency is subdivided into 100 piastres, and coins and banknotes are issued in various denominations.

Sudan’s economy is largely based on agriculture and oil production, but faces challenges due to conflict, political instability and international sanctions.

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